Published: Thu, April 18, 2019
Sci-tech | By Patricia Wade

Get Ready for Friday's Full 'Pink' Moon

Get Ready for Friday's Full 'Pink' Moon

Weather permitting, the United Kingdom will get the chance to see the splendid view of the full moon as it lights up the skies on Good Friday (19 April).

The Pink Moon will be fully visible around 4:12 a.m. PST and 7:12 a.m. EST.

In some other cultures, the Pink Moon is known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon. The site notes: "Native peoples once observed the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon".

Long wavelength colors include yellow, orange and red, which is why we see fantastically bright colors when viewing the moon or sun close to the horizon where the atmosphere is thickest.

France's richest man Bernard Arnault donates more than $300m for Notre Dame
The Holy Crown of Thorns and a sacred tunic worn by 13th-century French king Louis, two irreplaceable artefacts, were rescued. A national collection has been launched this morning by the Foundation for French Heritage.


So, how can you see this pink moon?

"Full moon names date back to Native Americans living in what is now the northern and eastern United States", according to Space.com. The phenomenon is all set to occur on the night of Good Friday and is known as Pink Moon. Supermoons happen when the full moon coincides with perigee, but the difference in size even for these "super" natural satellites is usually too small to notice for unaided eye.

The moon will reach the full phase at 11.12 am UTC. They also recommend taking a look the night before, Thursday, because the moon will be nearing its peak while illuminated against the dark sky.

Spring buds are silhouetted against the rising full moon in Washington, March 19, 2011. The peak of the annual Lyrid meteor shower, which is active around April 16 to 25, is expected to fall on April 23, a few days after the full moon rises.

Like this: