Published: Fri, December 07, 2018
Global News | By Blake Casey

Luxembourg to make public transport free for all

Luxembourg to make public transport free for all

It is home to about 110,000 people, but a further 400,000 commute into the city to work.

Luxembourg is set to become the first country in the world to scrap fees on all forms of public transport.

Prime Minister Xavier Bettel has promised to make public transit a priority and to lift fares on buses, trains, and streetcars by next summer, the Guardian reports.

Luxembourg City has some of the worst traffic congestion in the world, The Guardian reported.

With a population of 600,000 inhabitants, Luxembourg also proves to be the workplace of 200,00 people from France, Belgium and Germany who cross the border daily to work.

The move to make all public transport in Luxembourg free is aimed at reducing the country's traffic congestion.

If Luxembourg's newly elected government keeps its campaign promises, residents will be able to use public transportation for free, spend the money saved on legal cannabis, and smoke it on two new public holidays.

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The RBI, however, lowered inflation forecast sharply for the second half (six months) of 2018-19 to 2.7 per cent-3.2 per cent. The 10-year government bond yield closed at 7.441%, a level last seen on 13 April, from its previous close of 7.573%.


A free shuttle service is provided for secondary school students between their homes and school and earlier this year free transport was introduced for under 20s.

Drivers spent an average of 33 hours in traffic jams in 2016, according to a study.

And for older Luxembourgers, commuters get two hours of travel for just €2 ($2.27).

The national public transport system now costs around €1 billion ($1.13 billion) each year to operate, but only recoups around €30 million ($34 million) in fares, The Independent explained.

Now, from the start of 2020 all tickets will be abolished, saving on the collection of fares and the policing of ticket purchases. For example, a decision still needs to be taken on what to do with first- and second-class compartments on trains.

He now holds 31 seats in the 60-seat chamber, with Mr Bettel's Democratic Party gaining 12 seats and the Socialist Workers' Party and Greens achieving 10 and nine seats respectively.

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