Published: Thu, September 13, 2018
Sport | By Kayla Schwartz

NASA Releases Footage Of Hurricane Florence And Her 'Mike Tyson Punch'

NASA Releases Footage Of Hurricane Florence And Her 'Mike Tyson Punch'

Florence is now heading for ocean water with surface temperatures of around 85 degrees, meaning it will likely strengthen on its way to the East Coast.

The National Weather Service said 5.25 million people live in areas under hurricane warnings or watches, and 4.9 million live in places covered by tropical storm warnings or watches.

TRACKING FLORENCE: Stay with The Weather Network online and on T.V. for our exclusive coverage of the storm.

More than 1.5 million people have been told to flee their homes as Hurricane Florence barrels toward The Eastern seaboard. This storm is a slow-moving mammoth and will linger for days on the coast, heavily affecting not only North and SC but also Georgia and parts of Virginia before moving further inland, causing devastation to entire states throughout the weekend.

In Miami-Dade County, Florida, officials left almost 4,500 prisoners inside facilities during Hurricane Irma in 2017, even though multiple prison facilities in that county were demolished by Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Yesterday officials in Beaufort County, home to Hilton Head Island, held a news conference and urged people to leave voluntarily.

Fox News reported that sustained winds were picking up a bit along the North Carolina coast.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said: "Florence is still forecast to be an extremely risky major hurricane when it nears the U.S. coast late Thursday and Friday".

As of Tuesday, about 1.7 million people in North and SC and Virginia were under warnings to evacuate the coast, and hurricane watches and warnings extended across an area with about 5.4 million residents.

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"I'm not approaching Florence from fear or panic", said Brad Corpening, 35, who planned to ride out the storm in his boarded-up delicatessen in Wilmington.

Mr Graham said the Pamlico and Neuse rivers in North Carolina will see their flows "reversed" as storm surges push water back inland.

"Water, generators, all the people here, we have everything we need", he said.

One grocery store in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, sported a plea for divine intervention - with forecasters warning that the threat of devastation remains high despite the downgrade.

Upon its arrival, the National Hurricane Center projects that Florence could drop anywhere from 20-40 inches of rain along the Carolina coast.

Forecasters anxious the storm's damage will be all the worse if it lingers on the coast.

"North Carolina, my message is clear", a grim Gov. Roy Cooper said at a briefing today.

And if Florence weren't enough, other storms out there are threatening people.

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