Published: Wed, September 12, 2018
Sci-tech | By Patricia Wade

Residents told to 'get out now' as Florence takes aim at Carolinas

Residents told to 'get out now' as Florence takes aim at Carolinas

Moving and storage company U-Haul will offer 30 days of free storage at its facilities across the Carolinas and Virginia as Hurricane Florence begins to bear down on the U.S. East Coast. Forecasts predict as much as 20 inches of rain in some places but one computer model warned there could be up to 45 inches, almost four feet.

Forecasters said parts of North Carolina could get 20in of rain, if not more, with as much as 10in elsewhere in the state and in Virginia, parts of Maryland and Washington DC. Like Hurricane Harvey in 2017, Florence is expected to slow significantly when it reaches the coast, allowing the storm to dump a catastrophic amount of rain in the Carolinas.

A storm surge warning was issued from South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina, and the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, including the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers.

"If you're in an evacuation area, your window is closing to leave", the Newport/Morehead office tweeted Wednesday morning.

It could stall just off the coast and then drift south along the SC coast and possibly make a landfall as a weaker system if it doesn't make it clearly over the coast of North Carolina.

Packing winds of up to 220 km/h (140 mph) late Monday, Florence was expected to further strengthen and become "an extremely risky major hurricane" by the time in makes landfall in the Carolinas on Thursday, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in a 21:00 UTC update.

It was a potentially catastrophic Category 4 storm but was expected to keep drawing energy from the warm water and intensify to near Category 5, which means winds of 157 miles per hour (253 kph) or higher.

Hurricane Florence Zeroes In On Carolinas, Bringing 130 MPH Winds
North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper warned that "disaster is at the doorstep", and "tens of thousands" of buildings may be flooded. But his partner, Emily Whisler, said she will remain behind at the university where she is a resident in the psychiatry program.


The last time the USA capital declared a state of emergency was in January 2016 when a winter storm dubbed "Snowzilla" blanketed the capital region in knee-deep snow.

"This storm is a monster".

"The first thing is to protect your life", he said Tuesday morning. Tens of thousands of people are also expected to seek higher ground along coastal areas of North Carolina. "It's big, and it's vicious", he said.

Cooper added: "The waves and the wind this storm may bring is nothing like you've ever seen. However, if the storm does stall, it could drop 10-20" of rain, leading to flooding well inland. So we could have two landfalls - one around Wilmington and then one near Myrtle Beach or even south of there.

At the White House, President Donald Trump urged people to "get out of its way".

Experts say this could be the strongest storm to hit the Carolina coast in more than 60 years.

Like this: