Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Electronics | By Kelly Massey

Net neutrality officially ends today


The repeal takes effect six months after the Federal Communications Commission voted to undo them.

"We once again call on Congress to pass, this year, a law protecting the core principles of an open internet - no blocking, no throttling, no censorship, no unfair discrimination based on online content - and including robust consumer privacy protections that apply to all entities in the internet ecosystem and no matter how consumers access the internet". FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said he wants to return to a "light-touch" regulatory framework for the internet and is kicking authority to police broadband companies over to the FTC.

As already noted, today's the day that the FCC's 2015 net neutrality rules are officially eliminated.

And he rejected arguments that the move would lead to ISPs restricting access to online content, by blocking sites or charging a premium for faster delivery.

Big changes could be headed to the internet industry as net neutrality becomes a policy of the past.

"Under the Federal Communications Commission's Restoring Internet Freedom Order, which takes effect Monday, the internet will be just such an open platform". Here's what we can expect from tomorrow's internet.

A new state law requires Internet service providers (ISPs), like Comcast and CenturyLink, to treat the delivery of all data equally no matter which company originates it.

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Though today marks the end of net neutrality as consumers have known it, supporters of the repeal are adamant that the changes won't come immediately.

Millions of US broadband customers have started facing the latest internet experience from Monday because Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have new powers to block, throttle or offer paid fast lanes for content companies under the new law.

The Obama era mandate gave consumers equal access and equal speeds to all content on the internet. State officials, members of Congress, technology companies and various advocacy groups are still pushing to save the rules through legislation and litigation. "Those "fast lanes" will put those who won't or can not pay in the slow lane, making the internet a lot like cable TV".

The FCC is nearly certain to challenge Washington as the agency asserted preemption, in which federal laws have precedent over state ones. And consumer groups note that should the FCC repeal survive the looming lawsuits, the end result won't be pretty for American consumers. They're anxious the providers will charge consumers extra to reach particular sites and services in a speedy manner, either by directly billing them or by charging companies like Netflix, which could be expected to pass on the costs to their subscribers.

A group representing major cable companies and TV networks said Monday that "despite a new round of outlandish claims and doomsday predictions from groups dedicated to stoking political controversy, consumers will be able to see for themselves that their internet service will keep working as always has and will keep getting better".

Some states are trying to ensure that net neutrality is in effect, these states include Washington, Montana, and NY; other states have legislation pending.

"Following the decision to repeal net neutrality, many Americans anxious that the internet would turn into what cable-tv is: a set of options based on price and preference".

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